Local Area Information

Local Area Information


 

       

Gloucester

The City of Gloucester has a unique history from its Roman foundations to its Victorian docklands. Gloucester is a vibrant multicultural city that combines historic architecture with a unique blend of visitor attractions, festivals and entertainment, a collection of high street and specialist shops and a mouth watering array of tea shops, restaurants, wine bars and pubs offer food and drink for all tastes. Cradled by the picturesque Cotswold Hills and ideally located in the heart of the country, the city of Gloucester has a vibrant, lively atmosphere that combines a rich historic past with all the excitement of a modern city.

The historic Gloucester cathedral is a major attraction and has provided the backdrop
to numerous TV and movie productions including the ‘Harry Potter’ films.

The town centre itself provides a large mixture of major stores, but also numerous independent and regional retailers, many of which are unique to Gloucester, making it an ideal place to shop.

One of the other major attractions in the city is the Historic Docks. The docks and fifteen of its Victorian warehouses have recently been renovated and now house a number of exhibitions, antique centres and museums.

   

Cheltenham

The Spa town of Cheltenham is the most complete Regency town in England and lies within a conservation area of outstanding importance, patronised by many noble and royal visitors. It is one of the few towns in which traditional and contemporary architecture complement each other.

Shopping in Cheltenham is a truly enjoyable experience providing a wide variety of shops to peruse.

The Promenade is one of the most stylish shopping boulevards in England and is home to a number of the best known fashion houses. Montpellier and Suffolk areas provide a continental flavour with numerous wine bars, pavement cafés and specialist shops.

After dark, the nightlife of Cheltenham is vibrant with an abundance of bars, bistros, restaurants, theatres and clubs to provide entertainment for all ages.

Cheltenham is an experience that can be enjoyed by everyone.

       

Stroud

Encircled by five sweeping valleys opening out to the River Severn and made famous by Laurie Lee’s novel “Cider with Rosie”, the scenery is dramatic around Stroud. It is a great meeting place, with direct links to London, making it a Bohemian/café/gallery/ bookshop sort of place. Jasper Conran described the town as ‘the Covent Garden of the Cotswolds’.

At a time when the prevalence of chain stores has turned many of Britain’s High Streets into soulless copies of each other, Stroud is a welcome relief. With a bohemian vibe and an enviable array of independent shops, Stroud offers a unique shopping experience, unrivalled by any town or city in the locality. Brimming with character and standing amidst the dramatic backdrop of the Five Valleys, Stroud has an eclectic mix of shops in the most beautiful of settings. Where else would you find a specialist fairy store as you shopped for your groceries, or stumble across a fossil shop as you sauntered through the streets?

The award-winning Farmers’ Market is weekly (Saturday) and is one of the best in the country.

Throughout the summer months, street performers will entertain you every Saturday morning. There is a full programme of music and theatre throughout the year.

Nearby Stratford Park offers a range of indoor and outdoor leisure facilities, a lakeside walk and the Museum in the Park.

The town has a state of the art cinema and the Subscription Rooms hosts a variety of live events in a handsome late Regency building in the heart of the town.

Nailsworth is a lively artistic town full of surprises, nestling in a wooded valley and is renowned for its award-winning restaurants, pubs, cafes and other food outlets including Hobbs Bakery, (which sells a £21 boxed loaf, created by Tom Herbert during BBC4’s ‘In Search of the Perfect Loaf’), Williams’ Kitchen, Passage to India and the Weighbridge Inn, provide a mixture of fine breads, gourmet food, Indian spices and two-in-one pies.

The town remains lively throughout the day and evening. Small individual shops offer an amazing variety of goods – organic locally grown produce, first-class delicatessen products, fair-trade items from across the globe, fascinating antiques and collectables.

There are more than a hundred footpaths, passing picturesque cottages and handsome houses.

Nailsworth has the largest number of working water wheels per square mile in the country. One of the focal points for artistic activities is Ruskin Mill which is set in beautiful , organic water gardens.

Here you will also find an eight-mile Cycleway that follows the old railway line from Nailsworth to Stonehouse.

            

 Tewkesbury

Tewkesbury holds a unique position of being on the edge of the Cotswolds, but also forms part of the Severn Vale with the river Severn meeting the river Avon at the town. This is an ancient settlement where you will see one of the best medieval townscapes in England with its fine half-timbered buildings, overhanging upper storeys and narrow alleyways.

The Norman Abbey, built in the early 12th century, dominates the town and in 1471 the fields to the south saw the penultimate and decisive battle in the War of the Roses leading the house of York to power, mustard making, brewing and malting, pin making and the framework knitting of stockings were at one time major industries. Goods were transported on the rivers and a thriving market brought business to the town.

Tewkesbury and it’s surrounding areas have a wealth of attractions including “Out of the Hat” – Tewkesbury’s Heritage and Visitor Centre.

There are many historic houses, religious sites, local crafts and arts in the area, and a steam railway!